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Communicable Diseases Procedure-Students 4.601

ECC places a high priority on the need to prevent the spread of chronic, communicable diseases. The college is committed to educating its staff, students and the community about protection from and control of communicable diseases.

A communicable disease is defined as: “.a disease whose causative agents may pass or be carried from one person to another directly or indirectly ” (Miller-Keane Encyclopedia & Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, & Allied Health, 7th ed. 2003, p. 400). It is the responsibility of students and employees to report to the college any communicable or contagious disease with which they are diagnosed.

Admission/Attendance

A student who has a chronic communicable disease or who is a carrier of a chornic communicalbe disease may be denied admission to or may be dismissed from a particular program, or course of study, whenever such chronic communicable disease has a direct effect on the student's ability to perform and/or the safety of others.  Students with an identified chronic communicable disease may attend ECC whenever, through reasonable accommodation as necessary, the risk of transmission of the disease to others is sufficiently remote.

Admission/Attendance Decisions

The determination of whether a student/employee with a chronic communicable disease may attend college/work shall be made in accordance with procedures implemented by the college and consistent with the codes, acts, and laws listed in the references section of this procedure.

An admission/attendance decision will be made by the dean of student services or his/her designee in collaboration with the student/employee’s medical liaison as needed and based on the following criteria:

  1. the risk of transmission of the disease to others
  2. the health risk to the particular students
  3. reasonable accommodations which can be made without undue hardship to reduce the health risk to the student and others
  4. recommendations from any pertinent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) publications, and federal laws.

Health Testing

Some ECC programs and/or departments may have specific health requirements for admission and/or progression in that program or department or for employment. This may include a variety of tests and either demonstration of immunity or required immunization to protect both the student and any clients they may be involved in assisting during their educational program or work. On an individual basis, some students may be allowed to waive immunizations based on their personal immune status.

Routine or random serologic testing of students/employees for evidence of infection will not be conducted. However, if college officials have a reasonable belief that a student/employee poses a danger to others, the college will consult with the student/employee and the student’s/employee’s medical advisors and may require the student/employee to submit to medical testing at the student/employee’s expense according to the terms of the informed written consent/release from Student Services and/or Human Resources. A student/employee who is diagnosed with a contagious, infectious, or communicable disease may be required to provide a medical release in order to return to school/work.

Confidentiality

All medical and other hospital records pertaining to the student’s exposure will be kept confidential in accordance with applicable Illinois law and the federal HIPAA law. No entry will be made in the permanent student academic record of the college. Any necessary documentation will be maintained in a confidential file in the appropriate department.

Information regarding the student’s medical condition will be released to those college administrators who interact with the student only on a need to know basis necessary for appropriate care of that student or for the protection of others.

Administrators shall use such information only to the extent required for the performance of their duties, and shall not otherwise disseminate or act upon such information. Disclosure of such information shall be pursuant to a written medical release of information.

Review

College imposed restrictions upon students with communicable disease (including removal from class or access to the campus) or alleged failure to make reasonable accommodation are subject to review by the dean of student services or his/her designee upon receipt by the vice president of teaching, learning and student development of a written complaint filed by the aggrieved student/employee within 10 working days of the complained action. The vice presdient of teaching, learning, and student development shall issue a written decision regarding the complaint following his/her designee’s investigation of the matter, within 10 days of receipt of the complaint.

Required Reporting

Under Section 690.200 of the Illinois Communicable Diseases Code, college personnel having knowledge of a known or suspected case or carrier of any communicable disease listed are required to make a report to the local health authority (Kane County Health Department) within the appropriate time frame specified below. The reports shall be submitted by mail, telephone, facsimile or electronically (Section 690.100) to the local health authority. The local health authority will, in turn, notify the Illinois Department of Public Health. The time frames within which college personnel must report to the local health authority vary from three hours to 24 hours to seven days according to the classification of the particular communicable disease as set forth in the code. The occurrence of any increase in incidence of any disease or condition or unknown or unusual origin should also be reported, along with major signs and symptoms.

Class I
I. a. The following diseases shall be reported immediately (within 3 hours) upon initial suspicion of the disease to the local health authorities, who shall then report to the Department (IDPH) immediately (within 3 hours). This interval applies to primary reporter identified in Section 690.200 (a)(1) who are required to report to local health authorities who are required to report to the department. The section number associated with each of the listed diseases indicates the part under which diseases are reportable:  Any unusual case or cluster of cases that my indicate a public health hazzard, anthrax, botulism (foodborne), brucellosis, influenza A (Novel vius), plague, , Q-fever, severe acute respiratory syndrome, smallpox, tularemia, any suspected bio-terrorist threat or event

1. b. The following diseases shall be reported as soon as possible during normal business hours, but within 24 hours (ie,. within 8 regularly scheduled business hours after identifying the case), to the local health authorities, who shall then report to the department as soon as possible, but within 24 hours. This interval applies to primary reporters identified in Section 690.200 (a)(1) who are required to report to local health authorities who are required to report to the department. The section associated with each of the listed diseases indicates the part under which the disease is reportable: botulism (infant, wound, and other), chicken pox, cholera, diphtheria, escherichia coli infections, foodborne/waterborne illness, haemophilus influenzae or meningitis, hanatavirus pulmonary syndrome, hemolytic uremic syndrome, hepatitis A, measles, mumps, neisseria meningitides, pertussis (whooping cough), poliomyelitis, rabies, rubella, smallpox (complication of vaccination), staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, group A streptococcal infections, typhoid fever, typhus.

Class II
II. c. The following diseases shall be reported as soon as possible during normal business hours, but within 7 days, to the local health authority which shall then report to the department within 7 days. The section number associated with each of the listed diseases indicates the part under which the diseases are reportable: Arboviral infections, brucellosis, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, crypotosporidiosis, cyclosporiasis, giardiasis, hepatitis B, C, or D, histoplasmosis, Legionelosis, leprosy, leptospirosis, listeriosis, malaria, psittacosis, Q-fever, salmonellosis, shigellosis, toxic shock syndrome, tetanus, tickborne diseases, trichinosis, tularemia, vibriosis, yersinosis

II.d. When an epidemic of a disease dangerous to the public health occurs, and present rules are not adequate for its control or prevention, more stringent requriements shall be issued by this department.

(Amended at 32 III, Reg. 3777, effective March 8, 2008).

References

  • Communicable Disease Guide (2002), Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH)
  • Control of Communicable Disease Code (77 IL, Adm .Code 690) www.idph.state.il.us/rulesregs/rules-index.htm
  • Standards for Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information - Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA, 1996)
 
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